Instructor fluency correlates with students’ ratings of their learning and their instructor in an actual course

Michael Serra, Debbie Magreehan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The experience of ease or fluency that occurs when learners acquire information is often highly related to their metacognitive judgments of learning for that information. Laboratory-based research indicates that fluency can contribute to students’ overconfident judgments of learning and predictions of future test performance. Such research, however, typically involves artificial learning situations presented for brief periods of time and without a strong investment on the part of the learners. In actual courses, the most likely source of fluency may be instructor fluency: the experience of fluency that stems from content-independent attributes of the instructor and his or her presentation of the information. To examine whether this form of fluency relates to students’ judgments of learning in actual academic courses, we include a measure of instructor fluency in a survey completed by college students (n = 606) answering questions about their course instructors. Students’ content-indep
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1154-1165
JournalCreative Education
StatePublished - Jun 2016

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