Informing the use of vibrotactile feedback for information communication: An analysis of user performance across different vibrotactile designs

Yulin Wang, Barbara Millet, James L. Smith

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Feedback is important for Human Factors and Human-Computer Interaction designs. Since vibrotactile feedback has its own advantages such as no requirements of visual/auditory attention and robustness to surrounding noise, it is a valuable alternative to visual and auditory feedback designs. A literature review was conducted on empirical vibrotactile studies. Based on the 24 studies identified, a statistical analysis was conducted to investigate user performance across vibrotactile designs. Results indicated that using on/off vibration feedback for notification of new events resulted in the fastest responses (M = 1.1 sec.). In contrast, mapping vibrations to complex information yielded slower responses (M = 3.0 sec.) but still high accuracy (∼84.8%). Moreover, no significant moderator effect of decision complexity, cue availability, decision urgency, and vibration location was found. Overall, the study findings can shed light on further vibrotactile designs for information communication. Results also provide references for measuring user performance of such designs.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2014 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages1859-1863
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9780945289456
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Event58th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014 - Chicago, United States
Duration: Oct 27 2014Oct 31 2014

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2014-January
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

Conference58th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
CountryUnited States
CityChicago
Period10/27/1410/31/14

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