Information System Training, Usage, and Satisfaction: An Exploratory Study of the Hospitality Industry

William L. Gardner, David E. Gundersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study used a mail survey to explore the extent to which the hospitality industry employs various information technologies, including computer-mediated communication systems. In addition, we examined the relationships between users' perceptions of computer training and their reported satisfaction and usage of specific computerized information systems. The results indicate that: (1) hotel/motel size and chain-affiliation are related to information system complexity; (2) chain-affiliated hotels/motels provide less computer training, and less “in-house” training, than independents; (3) more training is reportedly provided for electronic cash registers than personal computers; (4) information system complexity is positively related to user satisfaction; (5) computer training is associated with higher levels of system usage and user satisfaction; and (6) user expertise is strongly related to system usage. Finally, we consider directions for future research and the implications of these findings for managers in the hospitality industry and beyond.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)78-114
Number of pages37
JournalManagement Communication Quarterly
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1995

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