Influence of steam-flaked, steamed-whole or whole shelled corn on performance and digestion in beef steers.

R. G. Ramirez, H. E. Kiesling, M. L. Galyean, G. P. Lofgreen, J. K. Elliott

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15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Three trials were conducted to evaluate finishing diets containing 67% steam-flaked corn (SFC), steamed-whole corn (SWC) or whole corn (WC). In a feeding trial, steers fed SWC consumed more (P less than .05) dry matter per day (7.6 kg) than those fed WC (7.0 kg) or SFC (6.7 kg). Average daily gain was greater (P less than .05) for steers fed SFC (1.33 kg) and SWC (1.31 kg) than for those fed WC (1.25 kg), and feed efficiency was better (P less than .05) for steers fed SFC (5.06 kg dry matter/kg gain) than for those fed WC (5.62) and SWC (5.79). Carcass characteristics were not different among the three groups. In a digestion trial, method of corn processing did not affect digestibility of dry matter and crude protein. Starch digestibility was greater (P less than .05) for SFC (99.1%) than for SWC (93.8%) and WC (93.0%). There were no differences in nitrogen (N) intake or fecal N among the three diets; however, urinary N was less (P less than .05) for SWC (19 g/d) than for SFC (27 g/d) and WC (32 g/d), and N retention was higher (P less than .05) for the SWC diet. In vitro dry matter digestibility of the SFC diet was higher (P less than .05) than for WC at 4 and 8 h of incubation and higher (P less than .05) than the SWC diet at 8, 12 and 24 h of incubation. In vitro gas production after 6 h was greater (P less than .05) for SFC than for SWC grain, which was greater (P less than .05) than WC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume61
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1985

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