Individual differences in children’s recall and suggestibility: The effect of intelligence, temperament, and self-perceptions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study explored the effect of intelligence, temperament, and self-perceptions on children’s recall and suggestibility. The relationship between recall and suggestibility was also examined. A total of 134 children, 63 preschoolers and 71 second graders, were exposed to a staged event involving an argument between two adults in their classrooms and were interviewed approximately 1 week later. Children were then administered verbal and performance intelligence tests and a self-perception measure assessing perceived general competence and social acceptance. Additionally, teachers completed a questionnaire to evaluate children’s shyness and emotionality. Results revealed that children with higher verbal intelligence recalled more information spontaneously than those with lower verbal intelligence and that children who provided more accurate cued recall were less suggestible than those who gave less accurate cued recall. There was also a significant interaction effect of verbal intellig
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)383-407
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

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