Identity, attitudes, and the voting behavior of mosque-attending muslim-americans in the 2000 and 2004 presidential elections

Dennis Patterson, Gamal Gasim, Jangsup Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a post-September 11 world, no religious group in the United States has become more important yet remains more misunderstood than Muslim-Americans. This is particularly true with respect to the manner in which religious and political attitudes influence Muslim-Americans-political behavior. This article addresses this issue by using data gathered from surveys taken in 70 mosques throughout the United States. With these data, this article maps the political and religious attitudes and behavior of mosque-attending Muslim-Americans and then analyzes the voting behavior of these respondents in the 2000 and 2004 Presidential elections. It will show that the cultural and religious traditions of Islam have resulted in most mosque-attending Muslim-Americans being social conservatives and, as a result, report having voted for Bush in 2000. It will also show that increasingly negative perceptions of the manner in which the United States war in Iraq has affected Muslims living American led many to switch loyalties and cast their ballots for Kerry in 2004.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)289-311
Number of pages23
JournalPolitics and Religion
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

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