I can hear you, but can I see you? The use of visual cognition during exposure to high-imagery radio advertisements

Paul D. Bolls

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study tested the proposition that high-imagery radio advertisements engage visual cognitive resources. Participants in a within-subjects experiment were exposed to 60-second radio advertisements previously coded as either high- or low-imagery ads. During half of the ads, participants were also presented a series of pictures unrelated to the content of the ads. Dual-task interference between the cognitive tasks of listening to the radio advertisements and viewing the unrelated pictures was found in recognition data for high-imagery ads but not low-imagery ads. This pattern of results indicates listening to high-imagery radio ads competes with visual tasks for cognitive resources. Therefore, it appears listening to high-imagery radio advertisements engages visual cognitive resources despite the fact these advertisements are auditory messages. Implications for theories of communication-evoked mental imagery are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)537-563+609
JournalCommunication Research
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2002

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