How to make a roman demosthenes: Self-fashioning in Cicero's Brutus and Orator

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article argues that Cicero's use of Demosthenes in his Brutus and Orator should be read in light of Caesar's dictatorship. An examination of Demosthenes' Hellenistic reception reveals that his significance in the Greek world centered on his rhetorical prowess and his (failed) opposition, as the last orator of democratic Athens, to the tyranny of Philip. Cicero, who now saw himself as the last orator of republican Rome, wanted to be remembered in the same way. For this reason he drew deliberate parallels between his career and Demosthenes' in these two works, laying thegroundwork for the associations he drewon in the Philippics and establishing acomparison that persists to this day.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)167-192
Number of pages26
JournalClassical Journal
Volume111
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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