How Can Pre-Service Teaching Programs Help New Teachers Feel Prepared to Address Absenteeism?

Michael Gottfried, Jon Kirksey, Ethan Hutt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Though policy makers are beginning to hold schools accountable for reducing chronic absenteeism, little attention has been paid to the role of teachers. No known study has examined whether rising cohorts of new teachers feel prepared to address this challenge. This is particularly problematic given that teachers with less experience tend to be less efficacious at reducing students' absences. Research Questions: (1) Do newly graduating teachers feel as if they have sufficient knowledge about chronic absenteeism? (2) Do newly graduating teachers feel prepared to address absenteeism? (3) Do these perceptions differ by elementary versus secondary preservice graduates? Subjects: Our study collected survey data from the 2017-2018 graduating cohort of general education teacher candidates from a statewide university system in California. This system prepares, on average, 800 teaching candidates a year, and all general education candidates participate in teacher licensure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)28
JournalTeachers College Record
StatePublished - 2020

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