Home range, habitat selection, and survival of Bobcats, Lynx rufus, in a prairie ecosystem in Kansas

J. F. Kamler, P. S. Gipson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ten Bobcats (Lynx rufus), five males and five females, were radio-collared and monitored in a prairie ecosystem in north-eastern Kansas from October 1995 to March 1998 to determine seasonal home range sizes, seasonal habitat selection, and survival. Home ranges of resident Bobcats overlapped among and between sexes, and sizes of home ranges did not differ between seasons. The composite home range of a resident male (20.0 km2) was more than twice as large as resident females (7.5±0.8 km2). Transient Bobcats had much larger (57.1 ± 15.8 km2) and less well defined home ranges, whereas kittens had the smallest home ranges (7.0 ± 3.5 km2). Resident Bobcats preferred grasslands in summer despite their lack of adaptations for open areas. In winter, resident Bobcats preferred woodlands possibly because of reduced food resources and greater competition with other predators. Transient Bobcats and a male kitten tended to avoid habitats that were preferred by resident Bobcats. Annual survival for resident Bobcats (1.00) was more than twice as high as for transient or dispersing Bobcats (0.46).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)388-394
Number of pages7
JournalCanadian Field-Naturalist
Volume114
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Bobcat
  • Habitat selection
  • Home range
  • Kansas
  • Lynx rufus
  • Prairie
  • Survival

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