Help-seeking: Testing the effects of task interdependence and normativeness on employees' propensity to seek help

Dean Cleavenger, William L. Gardner, Ketan Mhatre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study explores the effects of task interdependence (high versus low) and helping norms (supportive versus non-supportive) on propensity to seek help. Participants were most likely to seek help when: (1) task interdependence was high, and (2) supportive help-seeking norms were operative. A 2-way interaction also emerged. Under the non-supportive norms condition, help-seeking was greatest for high versus low levels of task interdependence; when supportive norms were operative, relatively high levels of help-seeking arose across task interdependence conditions. No support for the hypotheses that high self-esteem, high task specific self-efficacy, and low achievement motivation would increase help-seeking was obtained.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331-359
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Business and Psychology
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007

Keywords

  • Achievement motivation
  • Help-seeking
  • Self-efficacy
  • Self-esteem
  • Task interdependence

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