Hands-free administration of subjective workload scales: Acceptability in a surgical training environment

C. Meldoy Carswell, Cindi L Lio, Russell Grant, Martina Klein, Duncan Clarke, W Brent Seales, Stephen Strup

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Subjective workload measures are usually administered in a visual–manual format, either electronically or by paper and pencil. However, vocal responses to spoken queries may sometimes be preferable, for example when experimental manipulations require continuous manual responding or when participants have certain sensory/motor impairments. In the present study, we evaluated the acceptability of the hands-free administration of two subjective workload questionnaires—the NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) and the Multiple Resources Questionnaire (MRQ)—in a surgical training environment where manual responding is often constrained. Method: Sixty-four undergraduates performed fifteen 90-s trials of laparoscopic training tasks (five replications of 3 tasks—cannulation, ring transfer, and rope manipulation). Half of the participants provided workload ratings using a traditional paper-and-pencil version of the NASA-TLX and MRQ; the remainder used a vocal (hands-free) version of the
Original languageEnglish
JournalApplied Ergonomics
StatePublished - Dec 2010

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    Carswell, C. M., Lio, C. L., Grant, R., Klein, M., Clarke, D., Seales, W. B., & Strup, S. (2010). Hands-free administration of subjective workload scales: Acceptability in a surgical training environment. Applied Ergonomics.