Greenery versus aquatic: Cognitive restoration of different components of nature for improvement in environmental design

Theresa Nguyen, Brittany Neilson, Martina I. Klein

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prior research has indicated that aquatic components (e.g., lakes, rivers) of a nature environment have been perceived to be more restorative than nature environments containing greenery components (e.g., trees, grass); this finding has been coined as the "dose effect of water." However, the validity of this finding has been questioned as researchers have failed to generalize the dose effect of water to novel photos. Although subsequent research has been unable to generalize the dose effect of water to an individual's perceived restoration, no studies have observed the cognitive restoration of different nature scenes using performance measures on a sustained attention task. The current study was conducted to determine if certain nature components lead to higher levels of cognitive restoration. Our results indicate there is not a certain nature component that leads to higher cognitive restoration via performance on a brief sustained attention task.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages373-377
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781510889538
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018
Event62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018 - Philadelphia, United States
Duration: Oct 1 2018Oct 5 2018

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume1
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

Conference62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018
CountryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia
Period10/1/1810/5/18

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