Gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Gamma-Ray Bursts are likely associated with a catastrophic energy release in stellar mass objects. Electromagnetic observations provide important, but indirect information on the progenitor. On the other hand, gravitational waves emitted from the central source, carry direct information on its nature. In this context, I give an overview of the multi-messenger study of gamma-ray bursts that can be carried out by using electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations. I also underline the importance of joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave searches, in the absence of a gamma-ray trigger. Finally, I discuss how multi-messenger observations may probe alternative gamma-ray burst progenitor models, such as the magnetar scenario.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDeath of Massive Stars
Subtitle of host publicationSupernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts
EditorsPeter W. A. San Antonio, Nobuyuki Kawai, Elena Pian
Pages142-149
Number of pages8
EditionS279
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Publication series

NameProceedings of the International Astronomical Union
NumberS279
Volume7
ISSN (Print)1743-9213
ISSN (Electronic)1743-9221

Keywords

  • gamma rays: bursts
  • gravitational waves
  • stars: neutron
  • supernovae: general

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  • Cite this

    Corsi, A. (2011). Gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts. In P. W. A. San Antonio, N. Kawai, & E. Pian (Eds.), Death of Massive Stars: Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts (S279 ed., pp. 142-149). (Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union; Vol. 7, No. S279). https://doi.org/10.1017/S1743921312012835