Globalization and the Diffusion of Media Policy in Africa: The Case of Defamation of Public Officials

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The legal and policy transfer perspective holds that due to asymmetric power relations between nations, policy diffuses from global centers of power and influence to the periphery of the international relations system. Over the years, aspects of the landmark New York Time v. Sullivan decision handed down by the Supreme Court of the United States have diffused to Africa. This paper analyzes how law and public policy standards protecting journalists from the wrath of government officials in defamation cases have diffused from the United States to the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights and the African Court of Human and Peoples’ Rights. These African judicial bodies received, contextualized and Africanized international defamation principles with respect to public officials. I also explore how four African countries– South Africa, Kenya, Uganda, and Zimbabwe –have echoed the public policies set forth in New York Times v. Sullivan in specific cases involving media defamation
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-44
JournalHarvard Africa Policy Journal
StatePublished - Jul 30 2017

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Globalization and the Diffusion of Media Policy in Africa: The Case of Defamation of Public Officials'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this