Girls' cognitions of hypothetical friends: Are they related to depression, loneliness, social anxiety and perceived similarity?

Leslie E. Romero, Catherine C. Epkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined in 100 girls whether girls' depression, loneliness, social anxiety, and perceived similarity were related to their cognitions of hypothetical friends (prosocial, withdrawn/ depressed, and aggressive). Depression, loneliness, and social anxiety were each related to various friend-related cognitions, but only social anxiety and loneliness had unique relations when these three internalizing problems were examined simultaneously and with perceived similarity. After accounting for the three internalizing constructs, perceived similarity was related to higher wanting to be friends with and perceived acceptance from all three hypothetical friends, lower not wanting aggressive girls as friends, and lower expected rejection by prosocial girls. Findings highlight the importance of perceived similarity, and the importance of examining depression, loneliness, and social anxiety simultaneously, when assessing girls' friendship-related cognitions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)311-332
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Social and Personal Relationships
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Friendships and peer relationships
  • Homophily
  • Loneliness
  • Social anxiety

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