Girls' and mothers' social anxiety, social skills, and loneliness: Associations after accounting for depressive symptoms

Jayme N. Stednitz, Catherine C. Epkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined, in 102 mother-daughter dyads, whether (a) girls' social skills and loneliness are related to girls ' social anxiety, after adjusting for girls ' depressive symptoms, and (b) mothers'social functioning (social anxiety, social skills, and loneliness) is related to girls ' social anxiety, after accounting for girls ' social functioning (social skills and loneliness) and mothers ' and girls ' depressive symptoms. After accounting for girls ' depression, girls ' loneliness (and not social skills) was related to girls ' self-reported social anxiety and girls ' social skills (and not loneliness) were related to mothers ' reports of girls ' social anxiety. Mothers ' social functioning accounted for significant variance in girls ' social anxiety, beyond that accounted for by girls ' social functioning and mothers ' and girls ' depression. Mothers ' loneliness and fear of negative evaluation showed significant relations to girls ' social anxiety when variance attributable to other variables was partialed out, whereas mothers ' social skills and social avoidance and distress did not. Directions for future research on social anxiety are highlighted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)148-154
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

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