Genotypic characterization of antimicrobial resistant salmonella spp. Strains from three poultry processing plants in colombia

Alejandra Ramirez-Hernandez, Ana K. Carrascal-Camacho, Andrea Varón-García, Mindy M. Brashears, Marcos X. Sanchez-Plata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The poultry industry in Colombia has implemented several changes and measures in chicken processing to improve sanitary operations and control pathogens’ prevalence. However, there is no official in-plant microbial profile reference data currently available throughout the processing value chains. Hence, this research aimed to study the microbial profiles and the antimicro-bial resistance of Salmonella isolates in three plants. In total, 300 samples were collected in seven processing sites. Prevalence of Salmonella spp. and levels of Enterobacteriaceae were assessed. Ad-ditionally, whole-genome sequencing was conducted to characterize the isolated strains genotypi-cally. Overall, the prevalence of Salmonella spp. in each establishment was 77%, 58% and 80% for plant A, B, and C. The mean levels of Enterobacteriaceae in the chicken rinsates were 5.03, 5.74, and 6.41 log CFU/mL for plant A, B, and C. Significant reductions were identified in the counts of post-chilling rinsate samples; however, increased levels were found in chicken parts. There were six dis-tinct Salmonella spp. clusters with the predominant sequence types ST32 and ST28. The serotypes Infantis (54%) and Paratyphi B (25%) were the most commonly identified within the processing plants with a high abundance of antimicrobial resistance genes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number491
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalFoods
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Chicken processing
  • Colombia
  • Microbial profile
  • Salmonella

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