Generating an image from an ambiguous visual input: An electroencephalograhic (EEG) investigation

Harwant S. Gill, Michael W. O'Boyle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fourteen right-handed males were shown slides of common objects (e.g., wristwatch), familiar situations (e.g., two people shaking hands), and inkblots from a popular projective test (Holtzman, 1986) and then asked to name the object, assess the situation, or describe the most salient image emerging from the inkblot. Alpha power suppression was monitored over the left and right frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes to determine the brain circuitry responsible for the processing of each type of stimulus. When processing common objects and familiar situations there was bilateral activation of the parietal and occipital lobes; when processing inkblots, bilateral activation of the parietal and occipital lobes was again obtained, but complemented by selective activation of the right frontal lobe. The later suggests that anterior regions of the right cerebral hemisphere contribute to the generation of dynamic images like those evoked by visually ambiguous inkblots.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-293
Number of pages7
JournalBrain and Cognition
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2003

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