Gene expression, cell localization, and evolution of rodent submandibular gland androgen-binding protein

J. K. Wickliffe, V. H. lee, Ernest Smith, B. Tandler, C. J. Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A small dimeric androgen-binding protein (Abp) secreted by mouse (Mus) submandibular salivary glands has been hypothesized to function in mate-selection. The alpha-subunit (Abpa) evolves rapidly under natural selection. However, cellular site(s) of synthesis, mode of function, and patterns of evolution of this biologically important protein are otherwise unknown. We used a radiolabeled riboprobe and in situ hybridization to mouse (Mus) Abpa mRNA to localize Abpa synthesis to submandibular gland acinar cells. We next used a quantitative fluorescent thermal cycler (real-time PCR) to determine relative expression levels (normalized with a constitutively expressed ribosomal gene [S15/rig; rat insulinoma gene]) in male, female, and sexually immature European striped field mice (Apodemus agrarius). We hypothesized that gender or age-related differences might occur in production of a salivary protein related to sexual selection, but found no significant differences within our sample. Finally
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-60
JournalEur J Morphol
StatePublished - Oct 21 2003

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Gene expression, cell localization, and evolution of rodent submandibular gland androgen-binding protein'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this