Gas evolution of nickel, stainless steel 316 and titanium anodes in vacuum sealed tubes

Jonathan Parson, James Dickens, John Walter, Andreas Neuber, Magne Kristiansen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper presents a study on gas evolution of three different anode materials in vacuum sealed tubes under UHV conditions. The experimental apparatus consists of a high-power microwave (HPM) virtual-cathode oscillator (vircator) driven by a 200 ns, 80 J, 225 kV low-impedance Marx Generator. Plasma expansion due to explosive electron field emission has shown to lower gap impedance, spoil consistent low vacuum levels, and cut-off microwave radiation. The anode materials compared are nickel 201L (Ni201L), stainless steel 316L (SS316L) and grade-1 titanium (TiG1); with the cathode material being aluminum. The anodes were cleaned by the following method: rough polishing followed by electro-polishing, a ten minute microwave argon / 10% oxygen plasma cleaning process (ArO2) and finally, a 72 hour in situ bake-out at 300°C. Outgassing characteristics of each anode material are presented and compared.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2012 IEEE International Power Modulator and High Voltage Conference, IPMHVC 2012
Pages239-240
Number of pages2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Event2012 IEEE International Power Modulator and High Voltage Conference, IPMHVC 2012 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Jun 3 2012Jun 7 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 2012 IEEE International Power Modulator and High Voltage Conference, IPMHVC 2012

Conference

Conference2012 IEEE International Power Modulator and High Voltage Conference, IPMHVC 2012
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period06/3/1206/7/12

Keywords

  • High-power microwaves (HPMs)
  • Vacuum diode
  • Virtual cathode oscillator (vircator)

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