Gas evolution of nickel, stainless steel 316 and titanium anodes in vacuum sealed tubes

Jonathan Parson, James Dickens, John Walter, Andreas Neuber, Magne Kristiansen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper presents a study on gas evolution of three different anode materials in vacuum sealed tubes under UHV conditions. The experimental apparatus consists of a high-power microwave (HPM) virtual-cathode oscillator (vircator) driven by a 200 ns, 80 J, 225 kV low-impedance Marx Generator. Plasma expansion due to explosive electron field emission has shown to lower gap impedance, spoil consistent low vacuum levels, and cut-off microwave radiation. The anode materials compared are nickel 201L (Ni201L), stainless steel 316L (SS316L) and grade-1 titanium (TiG1); with the cathode material being aluminum. The anodes were cleaned by the following method: rough polishing followed by electro-polishing, a ten minute microwave argon / 10% oxygen plasma cleaning process (ArO2) and finally, a 72 hour in situ bake-out at 300°C. Outgassing characteristics of each anode material are presented and compared.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2012 IEEE International Power Modulator and High Voltage Conference, IPMHVC 2012
Pages239-240
Number of pages2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Event2012 IEEE International Power Modulator and High Voltage Conference, IPMHVC 2012 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Jun 3 2012Jun 7 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 2012 IEEE International Power Modulator and High Voltage Conference, IPMHVC 2012

Conference

Conference2012 IEEE International Power Modulator and High Voltage Conference, IPMHVC 2012
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period06/3/1206/7/12

Keywords

  • High-power microwaves (HPMs)
  • Vacuum diode
  • Virtual cathode oscillator (vircator)

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    Parson, J., Dickens, J., Walter, J., Neuber, A., & Kristiansen, M. (2012). Gas evolution of nickel, stainless steel 316 and titanium anodes in vacuum sealed tubes. In Proceedings of the 2012 IEEE International Power Modulator and High Voltage Conference, IPMHVC 2012 (pp. 239-240). [6518724] (Proceedings of the 2012 IEEE International Power Modulator and High Voltage Conference, IPMHVC 2012). https://doi.org/10.1109/IPMHVC.2012.6518724