Functional characteristics of disruptive behavior in developmentally disabled children with and without autism

R. Matthew Reese, David M. Richman, John M. Belmont, Paige Morse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

Expanding on Reese et al. [2003], functional behavioral assessment interviews [O'Neill et al., 1997] concerning disruptive behavior were conducted with parents of 23 children with autism (6 females, 17 males, chronological ages [CA] 24-60 months) and 23 controls without autism pair-matched for CA, developmental age and sex. All children exhibited frequent disruptive behavior. The interviews suggested that matched control children's disruptive behavior typically functioned to gain attention or items, or to escape demands in general. This was also true for girls with autism. For boys with autism, disruptive behavior more often functioned to (a) escape demands that interfere with repetitive behavior, (b) retain access to an item used in repetitive routines, or (c) avoid idiosyncratically aversive sensory stimuli (e.g., ordinary household noises). These results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral characteristics that are associated with sex and specific disorders or syndromes when conducting functional behavioral assessments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-428
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Behavioral phenotypes
  • Developmental disabilities
  • Disruptive behavior
  • Early childhood assessment
  • Functional analysis
  • Functional behavioral assessment interview

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