Fear of terror and increased job burnout over time: Examining the mediating role of insomnia and the moderating role of work support

Sharon Toker, Gregory A. Laurence, Yitzhak Fried

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

© 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. While the prevalence of terrorism has increased substantially, there is a paucity of research on the effects of terrorism on employee behavior at work. Building on conservation of resources (COR) theory, and its extension, the conservation of social resources theory, we close gaps in the literature by investigating the effect of fear of terror on increased job burnout over time, the mediating effect of insomnia, and the moderating effect of supervisor and co-worker support on these relationships. This longitudinal study followed a large sample of Israeli employees (n=670) across three time measurements over 7years, in a time period characterized by a high number of terror attacks. The results showed fear of terror to be related to elevated job burnout over time, even during a period in which terror attacks were reduced substantially. Further, insomnia mediated the relationship between fear of terror and increased burnout, while co-worker support, but n
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)272-291
JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Fear of terror and increased job burnout over time: Examining the mediating role of insomnia and the moderating role of work support'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this