Familismo, ethnic identity, and bicultural stress as predictors of Mexican American adolescents’ positive psychological functioning

Brandy Watson, Lizette Ojeda, Nancy E. Castellon, Marianela Dornhecker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Through the use of the cultural-ecological-transactional theory of resilience, the present study seeks to determine if the cultural factors of familismo and ethnic identity have a protective effect and if bicultural stress has a risk effect on the positive psychological functioning of 191 Mexican American adolescents. Two hierarchical linear regressions were preformed to determine the direct and interaction effects of these factors on self-esteem and life satisfaction. Results indicate that familismo values and ethnic identity both significantly and positively predicted self-esteem and life satisfaction. Further, bicultural stress significantly and negatively predicted both self-esteem and life satisfaction. Additionally, there was a significant interaction effect between ethnic identity and bicultural stress on life satisfaction; however, the interaction was contrary to the hypothesis that high ethnic identity would protect against the effect of high levels of bicultural stress. Resu
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)204-217
JournalJournal of Latina/o Psychology
StatePublished - 2013

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