Experiential avoidance, cognitive fusion, and suicide ideation among psychiatric inpatients: The role of thwarted interpersonal needs

Jared Roush, Sarah Brown, Sean Mitchell, Kelly Cukrowicz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

© 2017, © 2017 Society for Psychotherapy Research. Objective: The interpersonal theory of suicide posits the simultaneous presence of thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness (i.e., thwarted interpersonal needs) leads to active suicide ideation. According to the psychological flexibility model, psychological inflexibility is in part a product of cognitive fusion (i.e., becoming entangled or wrapped up in one’s thoughts) and experiential avoidance (i.e., avoidance of internal private experiences, which include thoughts and feelings). We hypothesized that thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness, in parallel, would mediate the positive relation between experiential avoidance and suicide ideation and between cognitive fusion and suicide ideation. Method: Participants were 118 adult psychiatric inpatients who completed self-report assessments of thwarted interpersonal needs, cognitive fusion, experiential avoidance, and suicide ideation. Results: Using bootstrapped p
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)514-523
JournalDefault journal
StatePublished - Jul 4 2019

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