Examining science and engineering students' attitudes toward computer science

Andrew Hoegh, Barbara M. Moskal

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

Concerns have been raised with respect to the recent decline in enrollment in undergraduate computer science majors. Women are one subpopulation that is severely underrepresented. To better understand the factors that discourage students, both males and females, from pursuing degrees in computer science, a valid and reliable survey is needed. This type of instrument would support the quantitative tracking of attitudinal changes with respect to the field overtime as well as attitudinal comparisons across various subpopulations. This paper describes a survey which is being developed based on current research in computer science education at the Colorado School of Mines through support of the National Science Foundation. Based on the results of a factor analysis and with respect to the pilot population (Colorado School of Mines undergraduate students), there is evidence to support the assertion that this instrument is accurately measuring the five constructs that it was designed to assess.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication39th Annual Frontiers in Education Conference
Subtitle of host publicationImagining and Engineering Future CSET Education, FIE 2009
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Event39th Annual Frontiers in Education Conference: Imagining and Engineering Future CSET Education, FIE 2009 - San Antonio, TX, United States
Duration: Oct 18 2009Oct 21 2009

Publication series

NameProceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE
ISSN (Print)1539-4565

Conference

Conference39th Annual Frontiers in Education Conference: Imagining and Engineering Future CSET Education, FIE 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySan Antonio, TX
Period10/18/0910/21/09

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Attitudes survey
  • Computer science
  • First year students

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