Examining determinants of adherence to peace journalism: Empathy, reporting efficacy, and perceived journalistic roles

Oluseyi Adegbola, Weiwu Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines the practice of peace journalism by Nigerian journalists and how factors including empathy, reporting efficacy, perceived journalistic roles, and training may promote adherence to peace-oriented reporting. Data were collected using surveys (n = 324) and semi-structured interviews (n = 10). Results suggest that Nigerian journalists subscribe more to the tenets of peace journalism than to war journalism. Findings also demonstrate that, while empathic concern and conflict reporting efficacy can enhance adherence to peace journalism, inadequate training may undermine efforts to promote peace through reporting. Further, perceived journalistic roles appear to exert limited influence on reporting of conflict. Taken together, results shed light on how individual characteristics as well as attributes of the context in which journalists operate can shape their conflict reporting practices. Challenges of conflict reporting in Nigeria and implications for journalists’ enactment of peace journalism best practices are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMedia, War and Conflict
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Nigeria
  • conflict
  • empathy
  • peace journalism
  • reporting efficacy
  • training

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