Examining Cognitive Models of Externalizing and Internalizing Problems in Subgroups of Juvenile Delinquents

Eric D. Frey, Catherine C. Epkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Examined cognitive content and processes, from models of externalizing and internalizing problems, in incarcerated delinquents (N = 177). Four groups were defined by multiple criteria (with 41 youth not able to be classified): aggressive-internalizing (AI, n = 22); aggressive-nonintemalizing (AN, n = 14); nonaggressive-intemalizing (NI, n = 27); and nonaggressive-noninternalizing (NN, n = 73). Groups did not differ on self-centered and minimizing types of self-serving processing distortions, although the comorbid group endorsed more self-serving distortions of assuming the worst and blaming others than the NN group. Aggressive, in comparison to nonaggressive, delinquents reported more self-serving distortions in reference to overt behavior content. In contrast, self-debasing cognitive content was related to internalizing problems, as both the AI and NI groups had more negative beliefs about self than both the AN and NN groups, and more negative beliefs about the world and the future than the NN group. The AI group also had more negative beliefs about the world than the AN group. Self-debasing processing distortions were not specifically related to internalizing problems, as no differences emerged between the AN and NI groups; however, the AI group differed from the NN group on 3 of 4 types of these distortions. Both of the internalizing groups had a more negative attributional style than the NN group. Theoretical and treatment implications are highlighted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)556-566
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Examining Cognitive Models of Externalizing and Internalizing Problems in Subgroups of Juvenile Delinquents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this