EVALUATION AND CONTROL IMPLICATIONS OF BEHAVIOR OF FERAL DOGS IN INTERIOR ALASKA.

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Abstract

Feral dogs (Canis familiaris) were studied from August 1979 through December 1981 in interior Alaska. Study techniques included use of radio telemetry, tracking in snow, and direct observation. Data were obtained on feral dog life history, including home ranges, activity patterns, breeding activity, foraging behavior, and interactions with tame dogs, red foxes (Vulpes vulva), coyotes (C. latrans), and wolves (C. lupus). Study findings challenged the hypothesis that populations of feral dogs or of dog-coyote or dog-wolf hybrids will not survive in northern regions because they are generally less fit than native canids and have lowered survival of offspring. Adult feral dogs and their pups survived winter conditions and were commonly active when temperatures were between 29 and minus 30 degree C. On one occasion, pups and their mother foraged away from the den when temperatures were below minus 45 degree C.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)285-294
Number of pages10
JournalASTM Special Technical Publication
StatePublished - 1983

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