Estimating the Dead Space Volume between a Headform and N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirator Using Microsoft Kinect

Ming Xu, Zhipeng Lei, James Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

N95 filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) dead space is an important factor for respirator design. The dead space refers to the cavity between the internal surface of the FFR and the wearer's facial surface. This article presents a novel method to estimate the dead space volume of FFRs and experimental validation. In this study, six FFRs and five headforms (small, medium, large, long/narrow, and short/wide) are used for various FFR and headform combinations. Microsoft Kinect Sensors (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA) are used to scan the headforms without respirators and then scan the headforms with the FFRs donned. The FFR dead space is formed through geometric modeling software, and finally the volume is obtained through LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corporation, Livermore, CA). In the experimental validation, water is used to measure the dead space. The simulation and experimental dead space volumes are 107.5-167.5 mL and 98.4-165.7 mL, respectively. Linear regression analysis is conducted to correlate the results from Kinect and water, and R2 = 0.85.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)538-546
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of occupational and environmental hygiene
Volume12
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 3 2015

Keywords

  • 3-D scan
  • Microsoft Kinect
  • dead space
  • headform
  • respirator

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