Enhanced mineralization of [14c]atrazine in kochia scoparia rhizospheric soil from a pesticide-contaminated site

Brenda S. Perkovich, Todd A. Anderson, Ellen L. Kruger, Joel R. Coats

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mineralization of atrazine (6-chloro-N2-ethyl-Af 4-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) in soil treated with a mixture of atrazine and metolachlor (2-chloro-6'-ethyl-N-(2-methoxy-l-methylethyl)acet-o-toluidide at concentrations typical of point-source contamination (50 /(g g-1 each) was significantly greater (P < 0-001) in rhizospheric soil from Kochia scoparia (L.) Roth., a herbicideresistant plant, than in non-vegetated and control soils. Soils were collected from an agrochemical dealership contaminated with several herbicides, including atrazine, metolachlor, trifluralin (α,α,α-trifluoro-2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropyl-p-toluidine and pendimethalin (W-(l-ethyIpropyl)-2,6-dinitro-3,4-xylidene), at concentrations well exceeding the field application rates. Mineralization rates of ring-labeled atrazine in both rhizospheric and non-vegetated soils were quite high (>47% of the initial 14C applied after 36 days) compared to literature values. These results suggest that plants such as Kochia might be managed at pesticide-contaminated sites to help facilitate microbial degradation of wastes such as atrazine in soil.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)391-396
Number of pages6
JournalPesticide Science
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

Keywords

  • Atrazine
  • Pesticide
  • Phytoremediation
  • Rhizosphere

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