Electronic cigarette use among college students: Links to gender, race/ethnicity, smoking, and heavy drinking

Andrew K. Littlefield, Joshua C. Gottlieb, Lee M. Cohen, David R.M. Trotter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use continues to rise, and current data regarding use of e-cigarettes among college students are needed. The purpose of this study was to examine e-cigarette use and the relation of such use with gender, race/ethnicity, traditional tobacco use, and heavy drinking. Participants and Methods: A sample of 599 college students enrolled in General Psychology at a state university completed a self-report questionnaire. Results: Twenty-nine percent of students reported prior use of e-cigarettes, with 14% reporting use in the past 30 days. E-cigarette use was linked to male gender but not to race/ethnicity. Dual use (ie, concurrent use of both traditional and e-cigarettes) was related to heavier use of traditional and e-cigarettes, and nicotine use was linked to pronounced rates of heavy drinking. Conclusions: E-cigarette use among college students is exponentially on the rise, and its co-use with alcohol may contribute to negative outcomes in this population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)523-529
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume63
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 17 2015

Keywords

  • college students
  • e-cigarette
  • electronic cigarette
  • heavy drinking
  • smoking
  • tobacco use

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