Electrical stimulation effects on tenderness of five muscles from Hampshire × Rambouillet crossbred lambs with the callipyge phenotype

C. R. Kerth, T. L. Cain, S. P. Jackson, C. B. Ramsey, M. F. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine effects of electrical stimulation (ES) on muscle quality and sensory traits of 12 Hampshire × Rambouillet callipyge lambs. One side of each carcass was randomly assigned to an ES treatment of 550 V and 60 Hz of electricity for 2 s on and 2 s off 15 times. The other side was a nonstimulated control (NES). Heated calpastatin, sarcomere length, myofibrillar fragmentation index (MFI), Warner-Bratzler shear (WBS), and trained sensory panel values were measured on the semitendinosus (ST), semimembranosus (SM), longissimus (ML), supraspinatus (SP), and triceps brachii (TB) muscles. Electrically stimulating the carcass sides induced a more rapid (P = .001) pH decline in the longissimus muscle, and ES sides had a brighter (P = .001) red color of loineye than nonstimulated sides. At d 14 of storage (2°C), the TB had the highest (P < .05) MFI value, indicating more protein degradation, and the ST and ML muscles had the lowest MFI (P = .008). Regardless of ES treatment, SM and ML had the highest (P < .05) WBS values. The ST muscle had higher (P < .05) WBS values than the SP but did not differ (P > .05) from the TB muscle. Electrical stimulation had no effect on WBS or any trained sensory panel values (P > .05). The percentage of loin chops rated slightly tender or better was improved 30 to 34% by electrical stimulation (P < .05). The ML muscle was scored lower (P < .05) in sustained juiciness compared with the SM, SP, and TB but did not differ (P > .05) from the ST muscle. The SM and ML muscles were rated lower (P < .05) in initial and sustained tenderness scores than other muscles. Tenderness scores were higher (P < .05) for the TB than for the SP but did not differ (P > .05) from the ST muscle. Electrically stimulating callipyge carcasses improves the tenderness of loin chops by increasing the percentage of chops rated from slightly tough to slightly tender.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2951-2955
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume77
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1999

Keywords

  • Callipyge
  • Electrical stimulation
  • Lamb (meat)
  • Tenderness

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