Effects of supplemental protein percentage and feeding level on intake, ruminal fermentation, and digesta passage in beef steers fed prairie hay.

A. S. Freeman, M. L. Galyean, J. S. Caton

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Abstract

Twelve ruminally cannulated steers (average initial BW 357 kg) were allotted to four treatments (three steers per treatment) in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design with 21-d periods (12 d for adaptation and 9 d for collection) to compare the effects of protein supplements that differed in percentage of CP and feeding level on low-quality forage utilization. Treatments were 1) control (C), ad libitum access to 5.6% CP prairie hay, 2) C +600 g of DM.steer-1.d-1 of a 43% CP supplement based on cottonseed meal (PS), 3) C + 1,200 g of DM.steer-1.d-1 of a 22% CP supplement based on corn grain and cottonseed meal (GS), and 4) C + 600 g of DM.steer-1.d-1 of a 22% CP supplement based on corn grain and cottonseed meal (LS). Ruminal total VFA concentrations were increased 8% (P less than .07) by PS vs GS 1 h after supplementation. Among supplemented steers, ruminal acetate (mol/100 mol) was decreased 1.2 mol/100 (P less than .03) by GS vs PS and LS; however, supplementation did not affect (P greater than .10) acetate proportions compared with C. Neither propionate nor butyrate was affected (P greater than .10) by supplementation, but among supplemented steers, butyrate proportions were 8% greater (P less than .03) for GS than for PS and 5% less (P less than .10) for LS than for the average of GS and PS. Ruminal pH did not differ (P greater than .10) among treatments. Ruminal ammonia concentrations were increased 1.4 to 4.8 mg/100 mL (P less than .07) by supplementation and typically were less for LS than for PS and GS at most sampling times. Prairie hay DMI (average = 16.3 g/kg BW) was not affected (P greater than .10) by supplementation. Fluid dilution rate was 8% faster (P less than .01) when steers were supplemented than when they were not fed supplement, and fluid dilution rate was increased 4% (P less than .04) by GS compared with PS. Particulate digesta passage rate was not affected (P greater than .10) by treatment, but total tract retention time was decreased (P less than .01) 10% by supplementation. Extent and rate of prairie hay NDF digestion in situ were not greatly affected by supplementation, but in situ disappearance of supplement N was 6 to 10 percentage units less (P less than .06) for GS than for PS and 2 to 6 percentage units less for LS than for the average of PS and GS supplements.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1562-1572
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume70
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1992

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