Effects of Processing Styles on the Preference of Restaurant Menu Type: How Do Millennials Compare to Other Segments?

Rhonda K. Hammond, Natalia Velikova, Tim H. Dodd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Employing an online survey, U.S. Millennials' wine consumers processing styles (cognitive versus affective) were identified and restaurant menu information preferences (visual versus verbal) were examined. Participants' processing styles were established then presented graphics of hypothetical restaurant menus, one visually oriented (symbols) and one verbally oriented (text). No significance was found in processing style across generational segments. Verbal was chosen over visual by those identified as Thinkers (high cognition / low affect). Feelers (low cognition / high affect) and Combiners (high cognition / high affect) were expected to choose visual menu yet also chose the verbal menu. The results support the continued use of traditional verbal menus used in restaurants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20-39
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Foodservice Business Research
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

Keywords

  • millennials
  • processing styles
  • wine information preference

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