Effects of dietary phytoestrogens on paternal responsiveness and maturation in the biparental California mouse

Aaron T Stamp, Trey Amador, Breanna Harris, Juan Pablo Perea-Rodriguez, Wendy Saltzman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) is a monogamous, biparental rodent in which fathers show strong attraction to pups while virgin males show variable paternal responsiveness. Previous studies have demonstrated that circulating testosterone enhances paternal behavior in this species via aromatization to estrogen. We tested the hypothesis that paternal responsiveness in virgin males would likewise be enhanced by dietary estrogens (i.e., phytoestrogens) from soy. Virgin males (N=16 per group) were fed commercially available diets containing high, medium, or low levels of soy from the time of weaning until sacrifice in early adulthood, and behavioral responses to an unfamiliar pup, body mass, testis masses, fat-pad masses, and epididymal sperm counts were compared among the three groups. No differences were found in males’ behavioral responses to a pup. Similarly, testis masses, fat-pad masses, and sperm counts did not differ as a function of dietary phytoestrogen content. Ho
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-49
JournalUniversity of California Riverside Undergraduate Research Journal
StatePublished - 2012

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