Effects of creep and built-in curling on stress development of portland cement concrete pavement under environmental loadings

Jung Heum Yeon, Seongcheol Choi, Soojun Ha, Moon C. Won

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

An adequate evaluation of stress developments in concrete is essential to ensure well-performing and long-lasting portland cement concrete (PCC) pavement designs and construction. In this study, the effects of creep and built-in curling (BIC) on the stress history of PCC pavements under environmental loadings were investigated primarily through a series of field tests and numerical data interpretations. To identify the stress-dependent strain component within the in situ measured total strain, a nonstress cylinder (NC) was employed in the field tests. The identified stress-dependent strains from the field tests were converted to stresses using a step-by-step numerical method. To investigate the effect of creep on stress developments, stress histories were computed in two different ways-one with elastic analysis and the other with viscoelastic analysis-and then their difference (stress relaxation) over time was evaluated. The finding indicated that creep may be a key element in the evaluation of long-term stresses and, in turn, the design and analysis of PCC pavements. Furthermore, this study examined the impacts of BIC on the residual stresses of PCC pavements. The result showed that BIC may affect the early-age stress development, but it has little influence on the long-term environmental stress state.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-155
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Transportation Engineering
Volume139
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Built-in curling
  • Creep
  • Field testing
  • Nonstress cylinder
  • Portland cement concrete pavement
  • Stress history

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