Effect of symptom information and intelligence in dissimulation: An examination of faking response styles by inmates on the basic personality inventory

Jarrod S. Steffan, Daryl G. Kroner, Robert D. Morgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study employed the Basic Personality Inventory (BPI) to differentiate various types of dis-simulation, including malingered psychopathology and faking good, by inmates. In particular, the role of intelligence in utilizing symptom information to successfully malinger was examined. On admission to a correctional facility, 161 inmates completed the BPI under standard instructions and then again under instructions to fake good (n = 55) or to malinger psychotic (n = 35), posttraumatic stress disorder (n = 36), or somatoform (n = 35) psychopathology. Unlike symptom information, intelligence evidenced some support for increasing inmates' effectiveness in malingering, although there was no relationship between higher intelligence and using symptom information to successfully evade detection. Overall, the BPI was more effective in detecting malingered psychopathology than faking good. Implications for the detection of dissimulation in correctional and forensic settings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-34
Number of pages13
JournalAssessment
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007

Keywords

  • Coaching
  • Diagnostic efficiency
  • Faking good
  • Forensic evaluation
  • Inmates
  • Intelligence
  • Malingering

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