Does Reading Cause Later Intelligence? Accounting for Stability in Models of Change

Drew H. Bailey, Andrew K. Littlefield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study reanalyzes data presented by Ritchie, Bates, and Plomin (2015) who used a cross-lagged monozygotic twin differences design to test whether reading ability caused changes in intelligence. The authors used data from a sample of 1,890 monozygotic twin pairs tested on reading ability and intelligence at five occasions between the ages of 7 and 16, regressing twin differences in intelligence on twin differences in prior intelligence and twin differences in prior reading ability. Results from a state–trait model suggest that reported effects of reading ability on later intelligence may be artifacts of previously uncontrolled factors, both environmental in origin and stable during this developmental period, influencing both constructs throughout development. Implications for cognitive developmental theory and methods are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1913-1921
Number of pages9
JournalChild development
Volume88
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

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