Does parental mediation of media influence child outcomes? A meta-analysis on media time, aggression, substance use, and sexual behavior

Kevin M. Collier, Sarah M. Coyne, Eric E. Rasmussen, Alan J. Hawkins, Laura M. Padilla-Walker, Sage E. Erickson, Madison K. Memmott-Elison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study examined how parental mediation of media (restrictive mediation, active mediation, and coviewing) influenced child outcomes. Three meta-analyses, 1 for each type of mediation, were conducted on a total of 57 studies. Each analysis assessed the effectiveness of parental mediation on 4 pertinent child outcomes: media use, aggression, substance use, and sexual behavior. The overall results indicated small, but significant relationships between child outcomes and restrictive mediation (r+ = .06), and coviewing (r+ = .09). Overall active mediation was nonsignificant, though active mediation was individually related to lower levels of aggression (r+ = .08), sexual behavior (r+ = .06), and substance use (r+ = .11). This analysis revealed that parents may have the ability to mitigate some of the adverse effects of the media by using certain mediation strategies. Overall, a cooperative effort from the communication and parenting fields is necessary for a comprehensive analysis of parental mediation as well as a disentanglement of the various parental mediation measures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)798-812
Number of pages15
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume52
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Media use
  • Parental mediation
  • Parental monitoring
  • Sexual behavior
  • Substance use

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