Do self-control treatments last? An evaluation of behavioral problem solving and faded counselor contact as treatment maintenance strategies

C. Steven Richards, Michael G. Perri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

Notes that in many cases, the effects of counseling do not last. Clients often abandon treatment procedures, and their initial progress deteriorates. This experiment evaluated 2 strategies for enhancing treatment maintenance: behavioral problem solving and faded counselor contact. 69 volunteer college students who were seriously concerned about academic underachievement participated in the study. Ss were randomly assigned to a no-treatment control group, a study skills advice group, or 1 of 4 self-control-plus-study-skills-advice groups. The design also included a no-contact control group of 11 nonvolunteers. Treatment was delivered via a combination of group methods and reading assignments. The major outcome measures were course exam scores and semester GPAs, with follow-ups conducted 6 wks, 12 wks, and 1 yr posttreatment. The results indicate that training in problem solving was an effective treatment maintenance strategy, while a brief fading procedure was not. Results also show rapid posttreatment deterioration on the part of the no-maintenance strategy groups. (21 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)376-383
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of counseling psychology
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1978

Keywords

  • behavioral problem solving vs faded counselor contact, effectiveness as treatment maintenance strategies in counseling

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