Do older adults with higher daily ambulatory activity have lower central blood pressure?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and aims: We aimed to test the hypothesis that central blood pressure (BP) would be lower in healthy older adults with greater daily ambulatory activity. Methods: Forty-three (24 women, 19 men) older adults wore a tri-axial accelerometer at the hip for one week. The volume of ambulatory activity was estimated by average steps per day. As a proxy of intensity of ambulatory activity, 1-min peak step accumulation or the maximum number of steps taken within a minute was averaged from each day. Participants were considered “active” if they had >7,500 steps per day or >105 steps per min. Radial arterial tonometry was used to estimate central (aortic) BP from pulse wave analysis. Results: After adjusting for age and sex, adults with higher steps per day (n=18) tended to have lower central pulse pressure (p=0.08). Interestingly, adults with higher 1-min peak step accumulation (n=25) had significantly lower central pulse pressure (40.4 ± 1.6 vs. 46.8 ± 2.0 mmHg; p=0.02) af
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)965-971
JournalAging Clinical and Experimental Research
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 12 2016

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