Do Hostile School Environments Promote Social Deviance by Shaping Neural Responses to Social Exclusion?

Roberta A. Schriber, Christina R. Rogers, Emilio Ferrer, Rand D. Conger, Richard W. Robins, Paul D. Hastings, Amanda E. Guyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study examined adolescents’ neural responses to social exclusion as a mediator of past exposure to a hostile school environment (HSE) and later social deviance, and whether family connectedness buffered these associations. Participants (166 Mexican-origin adolescents, 54.4% female) reported on their HSE exposure and family connectedness across Grades 9–11. Six months later, neural responses to social exclusion were measured. Finally, social deviance was self-reported in Grades 9 and 12. The HSE–social deviance link was mediated by greater reactivity to social deviance in subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, a region from the social pain network also implicated in social susceptibility. However, youths with stronger family bonds were protected from this neurobiologically mediated path. These findings suggest a complex interplay of risk and protective factors that impact adolescent behavior through the brain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103-120
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

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