Do criminal associates impact psychiatric inpatients’ social support and interpersonal needs?

Sean M. Mitchell, Sarah L. Brown, Jared F. Roush, Angelea D. Bolaños, Robert D. Morgan, Kelly C. Cukrowicz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Suicide risk is elevated among psychiatric inpatients; however, research has not examined moderators of the associations between perceived social support and thwarted belongingness (TB) and perceived burdensomeness (PB), such as involvement with criminal associates. Adult psychiatric inpatients (N = 142) completed assessments. Perceived social support was negatively associated with TB and PB; however, associates’ criminal involvement did not moderate these associations. A significant interaction indicated a stronger negative association between perceived social support and TB when participants spent more time with associates. Therefore, time spent with associates, regardless of criminal involvement, may be a relevant interpersonal suicide risk factor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)535-541
Number of pages7
JournalDeath Studies
Volume43
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

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