Divided attention costs for speeded and non-speeded movements to near and far targets

Melanic A. Hart, L. A. Dornier, T. G. Reeve

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research has shown that reaction times to a primary task are slowed when paired with speeded and non-speeded second tasks. The non-speeded effect has been attributed to attentional demands. However, an additional explanation for the non-speeded effect may be due to programming demands. The purpose of the present experiments was to examine both attentional and programming demands as explanations for the non-speeded effect. The first experiment examined the influence of speeded and non-speeded second tasks on the reaction times for a primary task. The second experiment examined the influence of the accuracy demands of a second task on the reaction times for a primary task. The results suggest that the non-speeded effect may be attributed to both programming and attentional demands.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)371-381
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Human Movement Studies
Volume51
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2006

Keywords

  • Attentional demands
  • Non-speeded
  • Reaction time
  • Speeded

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