Distance estimation training: A proposed model of transfer

Allyson R. Hall, Keith S. Jones

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Distance estimation is neither universally good nor universally bad. Rather, the level of accuracy generally depends on the task being performed. When misestimation does occur, training protocols have been implemented to improve one's ability to estimate distance. Unfortunately, results are mixed with regards to the effects of distance estimation training on subsequent task perfonnance. Consequently, reliable statements regarding the conditions within which transfer will occur are limited. As a result, the ability to apply these mixed findings to real world situations is hampered. As a solution, a transfer model was created using the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis as a foundation. Interestingly, one area of the model lacks evidence. Specifically, the effects of perceptual-motor recalibration training on subsequent ventrally-guided distance estimation tasks are unclear.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication54th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2010, HFES 2010
Pages2352-2356
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Event54th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2010, HFES 2010 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Sep 27 2010Oct 1 2010

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume3
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Conference

Conference54th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2010, HFES 2010
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period09/27/1010/1/10

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