Differentiating parent- and peer-related interpersonal correlates of depressive symptoms and social anxiety in preadolescent girls

Suzy T. Hutcherson, Catherine C. Epkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

One hundred preadolescent girls' (ages 9-12) and mothers' perceptions of parent- and peer-related interpersonal correlates of girls' depression and social anxiety, before and after controlling for comorbid symptoms, were examined. Girls' parental acceptance/rejection and support and perceived close friend support were more strongly related to girls' depression than to their social anxiety. Mother-rated girls' social acceptance was more strongly related to girls' social anxiety than depression, and girls' perceived social acceptance was unrelated to girls' depression after controlling for social anxiety. Loneliness and perceived classmate support were each related to both social anxiety and depression after controlling for comorbid symptoms. Results highlight the importance of controlling for comorbid symptoms and reveal some similar, and differential, correlates of depression and social anxiety.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)875-897
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Social and Personal Relationships
Volume26
Issue number6-7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

Keywords

  • Children's depression
  • Children's social anxiety
  • Loneliness
  • Parent-child relationships
  • Peer relationships
  • Preadolescent girls

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