Differences in Self-Determination Across Disability Categories: Findings From National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012

Xueqin Qian, Karrie Shogren, Omolola A. Odejimi, Todd Little

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Researchers have established variability in self-determination scores across disability groups, but most nationally representative research has used data collected over a decade ago from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2 (NLTS2). To provide an updated analysis of differences in characteristics of self-determination (i.e., autonomy, psychological empowerment, self-realization) across disability groups, this study analyzed data from the recently completed National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012 (NLTS2012). The authors tested measurement equivalence across seven disability groups: high-incidence disabilities (learning disabilities, emotional disturbances, speech or language impairments, and other health impairments), sensory disabilities (visual and hearing impairment), multiple disabilities (multiple disabilities and deaf-blindness), intellectual disability, traumatic brain injury, orthopedic impairments, and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Students in the multiple disabilities, intellectual disability, and ASD groups showed lower self-determination scores compared with other disability groups. Greater variability was also found in scores among these groups. Implications for assessment research practice, and policy are highlighted.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Disability Policy Studies
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • autism
  • developmental disabilities
  • self-determination

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