Differences in native soil ecology associated with invasion of the exotic annual chenopod, Halogeton glomeratus

Jeffrey J. Duda, D. Carl Freeman, John M. Emlen, Jayne Belnap, Stanley G. Kitchen, John C. Zak, Edward Sobek, Mary Tracy, James Montante

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

93 Scopus citations

Abstract

Various biotic and abiotic components of soil ecology differed significantly across an area where Halogeton glomeratus is invading a native winterfat, [Krascheninnikovia (=Ceratoides) lanata] community. Nutrient levels were significantly different among the native, ecotone, and exotic-derived soils. NO3, P, K, and Na all increased as the cover of halogeton increased. Only Ca was highest in the winterfat area. A principal components analysis, conducted separately for water-soluble and exchangeable cations, revealed clear separation between halogeton- and winterfat-derived soils. The diversity of soil bacteria was highest in the exotic, intermediate in the ecotone, and lowest in the native community. Although further studies are necessary, our results offer evidence that invasion by halogeton alters soil chemistry and soil ecology, possibly creating conditions that favor halogeton over native plants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)72-77
Number of pages6
JournalBiology and Fertility of Soils
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003

Keywords

  • Great Basin Desert
  • Halogeton glomeratus
  • Invasive plant species
  • Krascheninnikovia lanata
  • Soil chemistry modification
  • Soil microbial communities

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Differences in native soil ecology associated with invasion of the exotic annual chenopod, Halogeton glomeratus'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this