Differences Between African Americans and Whites in Reactions to Affirmative Action Programs in Hiring, Promotion, Training, and Layoffs

Ariel S. Levi, Yitzhak Fried

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examines the reactions of African Americans and Whites to affirmative action programs (AAPs) applied to 4 human resource activities: hiring, promotion, training, and layoffs. The results of a scenario-based experimental study conducted on a large sample (N > 800) of advanced undergraduate and MBA business school participants generally supported the hypothesis that human resource activity elicited systematic differences in reaction to AAPs between African Americans and Whites. The authors also replicated previous research on the effect of AAP strength and prior discrimination by the organization on reactions to AAPs. Results indicated that AAP strength levels moderated racial differences in reaction to AAPs, while the moderating role of prior discrimination by the organization was not supported. Implications for future research are discussed. © 2008 American Psychological Association.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1118-1129
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
StatePublished - Sep 1 2008

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